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Determinants of academic self-efficacy in different socialization contexts: Investigating the relationship between students’ academic self-efficacy and its sources in different contexts
M. M. Gebauer, N. McElvany, W. Bos, O. Köller, W. Bos, C. Schöber

Determinants of academic self-efficacy in different socialization contexts: Investigating the relationship between students’ academic self-efficacy and its sources in different contexts

Social Psychology of Education, 23(2), 339-358. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-019-09535-0

The present study examined the four sources of self-efficacy (mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal and social persuasion, and physiological state) and how these predict academic self-efficacy over time in N = 1597 (t1) and N = 1373 (t2) 7th-grade students. We simultaneously differentiated three different educationally relevant socialization contexts: the family, peers, and school. Although existing measures to assess sources of academic self-efficacy have considered different socialization contexts, they have done this neither systematically nor for all sources. Confirmatory factor analysis of the four sources in three socialization contexts showed a good fit to the data. Results of structural equation models at t1 showed differential patterns of substantial impact on academic self-efficacy in each socialization context. Over time, the impact decreased when controlling for SES. Results deliver only partial support for Bandura’s theoretical approach and indicate the need to revise social-cognitive theory.